What to do if you plan to take your vehicle outside of the UK after March 29 2019


With the Brexit deadline fast approaching, the Westover Group is highlighting to Dorset drivers the possible impact of a no-deal Brexit on driving in the EU.

From March 29, in the event of a no-deal Brexit, all UK drivers may be required to take certain actions, including having extra documentation to support a British driving licence, to be able to drive in some European countries. As a result, the south’s largest privately-owned motoring group is offering top tips on what drivers need to consider before heading to the continent by road:

1. Investigate International Driving Permit (IDP) requirements. The rule about permit requirements varies between EU member states. There are three types of permit; the 1926 IDP, the 1949 IDP and the 1968 IDP, and these can be obtained automatically over-the-counter at the Post Office for £5.50.

2. A GB sticker may be required even if a vehicle has a Euro plate. If a Euro plate is replaced by a GB sign without the EU flag a GB sticker will not be required.

3. Carry vehicle registration documents when driving abroad. This can be the vehicle log book or a VE103 to show the driver is allowed to use a hired or leased vehicle abroad.

4. A motor insurance Green Card may be required. This is an international certificate of insurance which proves that a UK motor insurance policy provides the minimum compulsory insurance cover required by the law of the country visited. Drivers should contact their vehicle insurance provider to obtain a Green Card. At least 14 days’ notice must be allowed for an insurer to process a request.

5. UK residents involved in a road traffic accident may need to make an insurance claim against an EU-registered insurer and will be subject to the local legal system of where the accident took place. The claim may be treated differently to how it would be in the UK.

6. UK commercial trailers weighing more than 750kg and non-commercial trailers weighing more than 3,500kg must be registered before being towed abroad. These trailers will need to be registered with the DVLA, display a registration plate separate from the towing vehicle and have a Trailer Registration Certificate obtained from the DVLA.

Established in 1923, the Westover Group operates from 28 locations across Dorset and Wiltshire and represents 15 vehicle manufacturers – Abarth, Alfa Romeo, Dacia, Fiat, Hyundai, Jaguar, Jeep, Kia, Land Rover, Lexus, Lotus, Nissan, Renault, Skoda and Toyota.

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